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5 good web design principles and examples for your web design inspo!

web design,design principle,good web design,web design principles,website design,good website design,effective web design,navigation,user experience,font,best practices,color palette,UX
Your website is your storefront. Does it appeal to your audience?

Whenever you walk by a store or restaurant, even if subconsciously, you will end up judging them by their storefront and display.

Do they offer the clothes and shoes that you like?

Do their menu and food photos look appetizing enough?

It’s even better if they have an attention-catching gimmick!

For example, in the summer, seasonal outfits on a mannequin with a beach backdrop and props are way more attractive as a storefront display.

If it’s just plain glass and you’re only seeing the clothes hanging in the store’s racks, you’re more likely to dismiss it and walk away.

Who has the time to walk in and browse through the racks just to see what the clothes look like? They might not even be your style!

You’re also more likely to consider going to a Chinese restaurant with attractive photos of their hot pot promotions and welcoming staff in Chinese outfits inviting you to try their food.

You might not even know what the food is, but they can be persuasive enough to make you feel adventurous and try it out.

In the online world, you don’t have a physical storefront.

You have your own website instead.

And unlike the people walking at the malls, it can be even harder to convince people to browse through your offerings if you don’t have an immediately engaging and attractive landing page.

You have less than 10 seconds before they bounce away and look for another site!

You have to immediately convince them that browsing through your site is not a waste of time and energy: we have something of value here!

If you want to have a website that your dream clients will want to interact with and, in the future, transact with, begin by understanding some basic web design principles.

Know your web design principles

Every time our designers deliver your website design requests, they first have to consider some web design principles.

These make sure that your website will be easy to understand for both you and your site visitors.

Here are some basic web design principles your site should follow:

Keep it simple and make use of whitespace

You want your website to be clean and uncluttered. Your customers should find what they need without feeling like they are navigating a maze.

Imagine your website as a storefront: a cluttered one with photos of your entire menu all over the place doesn’t attract foot traffic.

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Having too many design elements, colors, and text can make your site look too cluttered.

This is why we practice the use of negative space and visual hierarchy.

The visual hierarchy arranges the details on your website in a way that helps people understand which topics are most important and which texts just exist to support these topics.

In this article, for example, you can clearly see what the article is about with the article title in the biggest font and different colors.

You can then see the headlines under the article to tell you what topics are going to be discussed.

The paragraphs of text that support the headlines come in smaller text, which tells you that you can read them if you want to learn more about the topic.

This is paired with negative space, which essentially adds empty spaces to let the topics breathe.

It lets your users know which topics are grouped together, and it makes your web content feel less like a massive chunk of unreadable text.

Consider mobile usability first

Mobile users are the new window shoppers.

As of 2024, 59.45% of total global internet traffic comes from mobile internet traffic.

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Is your site easy to use and accessible for users on mobile?

Your users are more likely to check out your website on their phones instead of a desktop browser.

This is why you should make sure your website looks just as good on a phone as it does on a computer.

It’s also no secret that Google loves mobile-friendly websites.

If Google loves it, you’re more likely to be recommended in search engine results and reach your customers.

Use colors on your web page with purpose

Each color has a subconscious meaning we all associate with it.

Choose a color palette for your website that reflects your brand’s personality.

Even without reading your content or checking out your photos and illustrations, this color palette will already impact your user’s perception of your brand.

Consider how you feel when opening your most-used sites.

Even just seeing the blue of Facebook makes you anticipate what content you might be browsing through!

However, you should also avoid going overboard; remember, it’s a website, not a neon sign.

Be more deliberate in choosing the ones that resonate with your audience the best.

Here’s an article that might help you pick out some colors:

➡️The art of color harmony: a guide to color theory to create a balanced design

➡️Exploring the hottest color trends of 2024 across industries

➡️From bland to grand: evoke emotions with colors in web design

Font matters

Fonts aren’t just letters; they are your brand’s handwriting.

Choose fonts that align with your business identity.

Other than being visually appealing, your fonts should also ensure web accessibility.

While fancy fonts have their place, readability is key.

No one will bother to read your content if they have to squint through or put their reading glasses on just to read!

You have to make sure your fonts are easy to read, whether that’s for your headers or your body text.

We have some guides to help you choose the right fonts for your brand and website:

➡️Choosing the best font for your brand: a key aspect of brand guides

➡️How to choose the best fonts for your website

Don’t forget about user experience (UX)

Treat your website like a 24/7 customer service representative.

Make sure it’s friendly, helpful, and easy to understand.

If customers can’t find what they’re looking for, they’ll bounce away and head for your competitors, who can give them what they need better.

Make sure your navigation is clear and easy to understand so the users know which part of your website they’re on, whether that’s your homepage, your support page, or one of your blog posts.

This can help them understand where they have to go to find what they need, whether that’s more information about your company on your “about us” page or your package offerings on your “pricing” page.

5 examples of effective web design

Now that we’ve covered the principles, let’s take a look at some real-life examples of websites that have mastered the art of design:

SquareSpace and their simple site and use of visual hierarchy

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SquareSpace’s website is a lesson in simplicity and deliberate use of design elements.

Their clean design makes it easy for users to effortlessly create stunning websites.

Despite being simple, it doesn’t take away from the high-quality and aesthetically pleasing feel of the site.

Take a leaf out of their book and let simplicity speak for itself.

Mailchimp optimizing for mobile users

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Mailchimp’s website is a mobile-friendly paradise.

It doesn’t matter if their customers are on a laptop or a smartphone; the experience is seamless.

You can design and send out your newsletters with just a few taps even if you’re working on your mobile device!

Learn from them and ensure your website is mobile-ready.

Stripe and its iconic color palette

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Stripe’s website uses a bold yet limited color palette with purpose.

The serious business of online transactions is paired with a touch of trendy and approachable hues.

With this approach, they are able to widen their customer base.

Instead of just brands and companies, they can appeal to average people, who might use them for day-to-day transactions and receiving payments.

Use colors strategically to convey your brand’s messaging, like Stripe.

HubSpot uses fonts that speak volumes

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HubSpot’s website showcases the power of typography.

Bold, readable fonts turn every important piece of information into an easy-to-understand header.

They are also a great example of using visual hierarchy and white space.

Despite the large amount of content and information on their site, it doesn’t feel as overwhelming as they combine the deliberate use of fonts with visual hierarchy and negative space.

Choose fonts that make a statement and represent your brand’s personality.

Shopify optimizing the user experience with clear navigation

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Shopify’s website is a masterclass in user experience.

That says a lot because the site design process can get confusing once you’re building your own e-commerce website within another website.

How do you know which navigation is your site’s navigation or just the navigation of the website builder?

How do you know if you’re seeing a live website or just an unpublished preview?

Shopify makes it so easy for users, even if they have no background in coding or website creation!

Like their own website, every website you make with Shopify is also built with intuitive navigation and an easy shopping experience for your users.

Take inspiration from them and make your website a pleasure to use.

Practicing good website design with these best practices

Your website is your strongest brand ambassador.

By embracing these principles and learning from these examples, you can create a website that will build your online presence.

The digital market may be ultra-competitive, but armed with a well-designed website, you are ready to conquer it.

Remember, your website is like your favorite employee—it works for you 24/7.

So make sure it is designed well, and it will return the favor with satisfied customers and a thriving business.

If you’re building a website or in need of a website redesign, you can trust our reliable website designers at Deer Designer to handle the design work for you!

Schedule a client-fit call today.

Key takeaways

  • A website impacts your potential customers’s perceptions of your brand the same way a physical storefront does.
  • You should design your website to look uncluttered with the use of visual hierarchy and white space to entice users to read your content.
  • As a lot of users browse the web on their phones, it is important to consider the usability of your mobile website.
  • Colors should be used deliberately, as they can affect not only your website theme but also your users’s perception of your brand.
  • Fonts should be readable to any website visitor while still reflecting your brand personality. Consider accessibility for all users.
  • Having clear website navigation helps improve the user experience, as it lets them know where to find what they need on your site.
  • Websites like SquareSpace, Mailchimp, Stripe, Hubspot, and Shopify can apply the principles of web design and provide the best experience for their users. You can learn from them when creating your own website.